Interesting Facts about Dancesport

Going way back to its own history, the first unofficial dancesport world championship took place in 1909. It’s first own formation team was presented in 1932 by Olive Ripman at the Astoria Ballroom, London. Dancesport was first broadcasted on TV in 1960.

Interesting Facts about Dancesport

The five Latin American dances – samba, cha-cha, rumba, paso doble, and jive – had danced the world in Dancesport competitions. The fastest among these Latin dances is jive, which originated from the Blacks in the southeast of America. It was called “Cake Walk” in the 1880s since the usual prize for this dance is a cake. Paso doble also has an interesting side story, which is based on a bullfight. It plays the torero (the male dancer) and his cape (his partner) and is danced to the characteristic march music used for procession. Cha-cha originated in Cuba. Its name was derived from the Spanish “Chacha”, meaning “nursemaid.” Rumba also originated in Cuba, but it was derived, of course, from the rhythms of Africa.

Interesting Facts about Dancesport

The five Standard dances are slow waltz, tango, Viennese waltz, slow foxtrot, and quickstep. Quickstep is the fastest Standard dance. Foxtrot is probably the most popular social dance. It is a very elegant dance, and the dancers must look like they’re floating on the floor, making it look like it’s so easy to do the foxtrot. This dance was invented by Harry Fox for a stage show in New York in 1913. Slow waltz evolved from Boston from an early dance called the Viennese waltz, which originated from the city of Vienna, the capital of Austria. The popular slow waltz is the easiest Standard dance. The German composer Johann Strauss popularized the waltz. Tango originated from the poor neighborhood of Argentina (bordellos). It is the most sensual Standard dance. It is different from the other four Standard dances in that this requires a tighter hold and there is no rise and fall motion.

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